BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 PRODID:-//Robert F. and Jean E. Holtz Center - ECPv4.8.2//NONSGML v1.0//EN CALSCALE:GREGORIAN METHOD:PUBLISH X-WR-CALNAME:Robert F. and Jean E. Holtz Center X-ORIGINAL-URL:https://sts.wisc.edu X-WR-CALDESC:Events for Robert F. and Jean E. Holtz Center BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191004T103000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191004T120000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190920T114748Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190923T155543Z UID:3766-1570185000-1570190400@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Holtz Center Steering Committee Meeting DESCRIPTION: URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/holtz-center-steering-committee-meeting-8/ LOCATION:8411 Social Science CATEGORIES:STS Related Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191004T173000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191004T193000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190930T162536Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191001T164937Z UID:3823-1570210200-1570217400@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Fabrice Monteiro: In Conversation and Exhibit Opening Reception DESCRIPTION:\nFabrice Monteiro: In Conversation and Exhibit Opening Reception \nJoin Fabrice Monteiro in conversation with Van Vleck Curator of Works on Paper\, James Wehn\, and have the opportunity to ask the artist your own questions. Music\, refreshments\, and a cash bar to follow. \nFabrice Monteiro creates characters that emerge from oil slicks\, garbage dumps\, and dry landscapes\, and then photographs them to deliver a warning and an empowerment message to humanity. The colorful series that make up “The Prophecy\,” on exhibit at the Chazen Museum of Art from October 5 to January 5\, unquestionably awakens the collective consciousness. Monteiro’s goal is to continue his project around the world and thus involve all cultures and all continents in a dialogue on a global scale. \nThis event is free and open to the public.  \n\n\n\n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/fabrice-monteiro-in-conversation-and-exhibit-opening-reception/ LOCATION:Chazen Museum of Art\, 750 University Avenue\, Madison\, WI CATEGORIES:UW Campus Events ORGANIZER;CN="Sawyer%20Seminar%20Series":MAILTO:plantationoceneseminar@gmail.com END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191008T073000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191008T173000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190912T131839Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190912T131839Z UID:3663-1570519800-1570555800@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:CRISPRcon Midwest DESCRIPTION:CRISPRcon Midwest will be held at UW-Madison on Tuesday\, October 8th! (CRISPRcon) Conversations on Science\, Society & the Future of Gene Editing will host its first regional event at the Discovery Building to bring diverse voices together to discuss societal considerations for the future of CRISPR and other gene editing technologies. \nAll attendees are welcome to lead an informal discussion table during lunch. Submit your topic to contact@crisprcon.org by Wednesday\, September 18. \nRegister to attend \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/crisprcon-midwest/ LOCATION:H.F. DeLuca Forum\, Discovery Building\, 330 N. Orchard St. CATEGORIES:STS Related Events,UW Campus Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191008T180000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191008T180000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20191004T150532Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191004T150744Z UID:3854-1570557600-1570557600@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Why & How Understanding the Diagnosis of Autisum Spectrum Disorder Embodies the Wisconsin Idea DESCRIPTION:Wisconsin Idea Lecture with Holtz Center member\, Douglas Maynard \n \nMy research and teaching focus on interaction in settings of everyday life. I draw on theoretical and empirical traditions in ethnomethodology\, conversation analysis\, and Goffmanian interaction order analysis\, and have studied everyday talk as well as legal and medical discourse. Among other projects\, the main emphasis currently is a project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation to study the testing and diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders. We are collecting digital video recordings of testing environments\, discussions among clinical staff wherein they determine a diagnosis\, and the informing interview where they present ASD diagnoses to family members. \nVisit the Facebook event here. \nStream live here on October 8th at 6 pm. \nWisconsin Idea – Week 5 – Poster \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/why-how-understanding-the-diagnosis-of-autisum-spectrum-disorder-embodies-the-wisconsin-idea/ LOCATION:1111 Genetics-Biotechnology Center\, 425 Henry Mall\, Madison\, WI CATEGORIES:UW Campus Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191009T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191009T170000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190912T164450Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190912T164450Z UID:3680-1570636800-1570640400@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Making Abolition Geography: Social Justice Organizing in Local\, State\, and International Perspective DESCRIPTION:Interrogating the Plantationocene: A UW-Madison Mellon Sawyer Seminar is right around the corner! The October events explore the theme of “laboring bodies”. \n– LABORING BODIES EVENTS – \nOctober 5 to January 5\nFabrice Monteiro: The Prophecy\nChazen Museum of Art \nWednesday October 9\, 4 pm\n“Making Abolition Geography: Social Justice Organizing in Local\, State\, and International Perspective.” \nHumanities without Boundaries Lecture: Ruth Wilson Gilmore (CUNY Graduate Center)\nH.F. DeLuca Forum\, Discovery Building\nFREE & open to the public. \nThursday October 10\, 2019\, 7 pm\nA Roundtable on Laboring Bodies\nRuth Wilson Gilmore\, Sarah Besky (Brown)\, and Sasha Turner (Quinnipiac U)\nWisconsin Historical Society Auditorium\nFREE & open to the public. \nFriday October 11\, 2019\, 9-11:30 am\nLaboring Bodies Workshop\nRuth Wilson Gilmore\, Sarah Besky\, and Sasha Turner\n7191 Helen C. White Building\nPRE-REGISTRATION required & limited. \nRegister for the Laboring Bodies workshop:\nhttps://forms.gle/JdqhLM2kwZeqEKiB9 \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/making-abolition-geography-social-justice-organizing-in-local-state-and-international-perspective/ LOCATION:H.F. DeLuca Forum\, Discovery Building\, 330 N. Orchard St. CATEGORIES:STS Related Events,UW Campus Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191010T123000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191010T133000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190501T174937Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191011T164831Z UID:3219-1570710600-1570714200@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:The Impracticality of Practical Research: A History of Contemporary Sciences of Change that Conserve DESCRIPTION:The Impracticality of Practical Research: A History of Contemporary Sciences of Change that Conserve\nA Brown Bag with Thomas Popkewitz\, Professor\, Curriculum and Instruction \n \n  \n  \n  \n  \n  \n  \n  \n  \n  \nThere is an alluring\, daunting\, and haunting desire in contemporary Western European and American social sciences. That desire is for research is to find the practical knowledge that enables change to bring about a good life in a just and equitable society. This desire haunts the 19th century emergence of the social sciences and becomes more pronounced in the post-war mobilizations of research in the expansion of the welfare states. This vision of practical knowledge is captured today in the international assessments of national school systems and professional education that identifies the pathways for governments to modernize school systems and provide for the well-being of its people. This faith embodies particular links between American policy and research in which reforms are verified by “scientific\, empirical evidences” about “what works”. \nThis brown bag focuses historically on present principles that order the “practical” sciences as more profound\, complex and paradoxical than initially suggested in the formulation of the research. The discussion asks: “What if the orthodoxies of science as having practical knowledge have little historical evidence to sustain its promise?” “What if the “scientific evidence” of the practical research is not merely about facts\, evidence or “Science\,” but about the ordering of conduct to change social life and people that produces differences and divisions?” And if I have time\, I will talk about an alternative notion of science and social change. \nThe title and discussion draws on a book of the brown bag (University of Michigan\, 2020). The study of science draws on a range of social and cultural theories and historical studies to understand the political of the sciences and scientific knowledge of social and educational change. \nRelated readings: \nPopkewitz & Lindblad-Statistics Reasoning Numbers Book \nPopkewitz Salvation\, Redemption and Desire Kongeter Book \n  \nPopkewitz Brown Bag Poster \n \n  \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/popkewitz/ LOCATION:8411 Social Science CATEGORIES:Brown Bag Series END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191010T190000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191010T190000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190912T164624Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190912T164624Z UID:3683-1570734000-1570734000@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:A Roundtable on Laboring Bodies DESCRIPTION:Interrogating the Plantationocene: A UW-Madison Mellon Sawyer Seminar is right around the corner! The October events explore the theme of “laboring bodies”. \n– LABORING BODIES EVENTS – \nOctober 5 to January 5\nFabrice Monteiro: The Prophecy\nChazen Museum of Art \nWednesday October 9\, 4 pm\n“Making Abolition Geography: Social Justice Organizing in Local\, State\, and International Perspective.”\nHumanities without Boundaries Lecture: Ruth Wilson Gilmore (CUNY Graduate Center)\nH.F. DeLuca Forum\, Discovery Building\nFREE & open to the public. \nThursday October 10\, 2019\, 7 pm\nA Roundtable on Laboring Bodies\nRuth Wilson Gilmore\, Sarah Besky (Brown)\, and Sasha Turner (Quinnipiac U)\nWisconsin Historical Society Auditorium\nFREE & open to the public. \nFriday October 11\, 2019\, 9-11:30 am\nLaboring Bodies Workshop\nRuth Wilson Gilmore\, Sarah Besky\, and Sasha Turner\n7191 Helen C. White Building\nPRE-REGISTRATION required & limited. \nRegister for the Laboring Bodies workshop:\nhttps://forms.gle/JdqhLM2kwZeqEKiB9 \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/a-roundtable-on-laboring-bodies/ LOCATION:Wisconsin Historical Society Auditorium\, 816 State Street\, Madison\, WI CATEGORIES:UW Campus Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191011T090000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191011T113000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190912T164856Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190912T170524Z UID:3686-1570784400-1570793400@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Laboring Bodies Workshop DESCRIPTION:Interrogating the Plantationocene: A UW-Madison Mellon Sawyer Seminar is right around the corner! The October events explore the theme of “laboring bodies”. \n– LABORING BODIES EVENTS – \nOctober 5 to January 5\nFabrice Monteiro: The Prophecy\nChazen Museum of Art \nWednesday October 9\, 4 pm\n“Making Abolition Geography: Social Justice Organizing in Local\, State\, and International Perspective.”\nHumanities without Boundaries Lecture: Ruth Wilson Gilmore (CUNY Graduate Center)\nH.F. DeLuca Forum\, Discovery Building\nFREE & open to the public. \nThursday October 10\, 2019\, 7 pm\nA Roundtable on Laboring Bodies\nRuth Wilson Gilmore\, Sarah Besky (Brown)\, and Sasha Turner (Quinnipiac U)\nWisconsin Historical Society Auditorium\nFREE & open to the public. \nFriday October 11\, 2019\, 9-11:30 am\nLaboring Bodies Workshop\nRuth Wilson Gilmore\, Sarah Besky\, and Sasha Turner \n7191 Helen C. White Building\nPRE-REGISTRATION required & limited. \nRegister for the Laboring Bodies workshop:\nhttps://forms.gle/JdqhLM2kwZeqEKiB9 \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/laboring-bodies-workshop/ LOCATION:7191 Helen C White Building CATEGORIES:UW Campus Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191015T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191015T130000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20191004T153541Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191004T153541Z UID:3868-1571140800-1571144400@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Food\, Science\, Consumption: Beyond the Pure Food and Drugs Act of 1906 DESCRIPTION:Go Big Read – The Poison Squad – Lecture Series \nFood\, Science\, Consumption: Beyond the Pure Food and Drugs Act of 1906\nLecture by Lisa Haushofer\, PhD\, University of Toronto\, Culinaria Research Center \nDr. Haushofer’s talk forms part of a wider campus conversation around Deborah Blum’s The Poison Squad\, and she will explore the movement against food adulteration beyond Harvey Washington Wiley. In examining the broader context of nutrition science “in public” and some of the mechanisms of non-expert food evaluations\, Dr. Haushofer will demonstrate how the food industry mobilized against expert evaluation. \nFood will be provided for those who RSVP \nPresented by: Social and Administrative Sciences Division of the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Pharmacy &\nthe American Institute of the History of Pharmacy \nGo Big Read Poster – Haushofer \n \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/food-science-consumption-beyond-the-pure-food-and-drugs-act-of-1906/ LOCATION:1116 Rennebohm Hall\, School of Pharmacy CATEGORIES:UW Campus Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191017T080000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191020T200000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190815T132511Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190815T132511Z UID:3525-1571299200-1571601600@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Wisconsin Science Festival DESCRIPTION:A four-day statewide celebration with events for all ages. \nMore information \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/wisconsin-science-festival-2/ CATEGORIES:Special Events,UW Campus Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191017T140000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191017T153000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20191004T143950Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191004T144342Z UID:3849-1571320800-1571326200@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Who owns science? DESCRIPTION:Our current culture recognizes certain ways of participating in and practicing science\, technology\, engineering and mathematics (STEM). What do we lose when we leave out practices and perspectives from non-white\, non-dominant cultures and legacies? How can we expand our understanding of STEM? \nJoin us in the Discovery Building’s H.F. DeLuca Forum as an expert panel discusses STEM from a diverse and inclusive set of viewpoints. \nPanel explores representation\, inclusion\, culture and the scientific enterprise. \nModerator: Rabiah Mayas\, Northwestern University \nPanelists:\nCheryl Bauer-Armstrong\, UW-Madison Earth Partnership\nLori Lemieux\, Bad River Education Department\nGinger Contreras\, Wisconsin Institute for Discovery\nDorothy Lsoto\, Nelson Institute\nMichelle Allness\, DNR\nReynaldo Morales\, UW-Madison School of Education \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/who-owns-science/ LOCATION:Discovery Building\, 330 N. Orchard St.\, Madison\, WI CATEGORIES:UW Campus Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191017T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191017T180000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20191008T163032Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191011T123945Z UID:3873-1571328000-1571335200@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Holtz Center Member Happy Hour DESCRIPTION:The Holtz Center will host a happy hour gathering at the Italian Workmen’s Club/Greenbush Bar (914 Regent Street) on Thursday\, October 17th\, 4:00-6:00 pm. \nLight refreshments will be provided. Cash bar will be available. We hope that you can join us for this informal\, social gathering with your STS colleagues. \n \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/holtz-center-member-happy-hour/ LOCATION:Workmen’s Club/Greenbush Bar\, 914 Regent Street\, Madison\, WI CATEGORIES:Special Events,STS Related Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191018T100000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191018T111500 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20191008T165731Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191008T170823Z UID:3877-1571392800-1571397300@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Citizen Science: Understanding Online User Behaviors and Technologies DESCRIPTION:“Citizen Science: Understanding Online User Behaviors and Technologies”\nCorey Jackson\, PhD\nFriday\, October 18\, 10:00-11:15am\, “Bunge Room” 4207 HC White Hall \nAbstract: The success of online crowdsourcing and peer production platforms depend on the voluntary contributions of people. A persistent problem plaguing crowdsourcing and peer production platforms is encouraging people to join and to remain active contributors. The research reports on the findings of an online field experiment where novelty cues were used to motivate volunteers. I provide an overview of novelty unpacking its theoretical origins\, neurological processes\, physiological responses. I outline the results of an experiment where the behaviors of volunteers to three citizen science projects were assessed. The research results will improve understanding of the basis\, mechanisms\, and purposes of novelty and its effects on human behavior. \nBiography: Corey Jackson is a postdoctoral fellow at Berkeley’s School of Information. At Berkeley\, Corey teaches a research design course in the Master’s in Data Science (MIDS) program and conducts independent research on understanding human behaviors in online citizen science projects as well as research focused on understanding how professional scientists integrate crowdsourced data into existing scientific practices. Before joining Berkeley\, Jackson completed his Ph.D. at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies. \nFor more information\, please contact Kristin Eschenfelder. \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/citizen-science-understanding-online-user-behaviors-and-technologies/ LOCATION:4207 HC White Hall\, Bunge Room CATEGORIES:UW Campus Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191018T140000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191018T153000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20191004T151759Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191004T152308Z UID:3863-1571407200-1571412600@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Science in Entertainment and the Arts: The Most Powerful Way to Communicate Science? DESCRIPTION:For all the efforts to encourage scientists to engage with the public\, there may be one way that is exponentially more influential than any other—through entertainment and the arts. Join us in the Discovery Building’s H.F. DeLuca Forum as experts from the worlds of visual art\, theater\, dance and film explore the power of each of their crafts to connect with\, and influence\, audiences. \n \nRegister now. \nFeaturing: \n\nJo Handelsman\, Director of the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery (moderator)\nGinger Ann Contreras\, Coordinator\, Science to Street Art\, and Executive Director\, Illuminating Discovery Hub\nElizabeth Kilpatrick\, Geena Davis Institute\nDavid Lynn\, Emory University\nCarrie Hanson\, the Seldoms and UW-Madison Artist-in-Residence\nMichael Graf\, Spot Filmworks\n\nThen\, join Michael Graf and David Lynn for a follow-on conversation about what happens when scientists and playwrights join forces from 3:45 to 4:30 p.m. Register for this breakout session. \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/science-in-entertainment-and-the-arts-the-most-powerful-way-to-communicate-science/ LOCATION:Discovery Building\, 330 N. Orchard St.\, Madison\, WI CATEGORIES:UW Campus Events ORGANIZER;CN="Wisconsin%20Science%20Festival":MAILTO:towncenter@warf.org END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191022T180000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191022T180000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190916T160437Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191010T124611Z UID:3710-1571767200-1571767200@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:What is Food and Who Decides?: Insects as Food DESCRIPTION:What is Food and Who Decides?: Insects as Food \nThough insects have long been dietary mainstays in many parts of the world\, interest in farmed insects as food is only now beginning to catch on in the US. How will insects be handled by our food regulatory structures? Which stakeholders will get a say in how food policies incorporate the addition of insects to our food systems? Can members of the public participate in the policy-making process? This panel brings together experts on food regulation and entomophagy to discuss the present and future of insects as food. There will be plenty of time for audience questions and discussion\, and L’Etoile alums Andy Jack and Toby Lunt will be serving some creative insect-based dishes for sampling. \n \nPanelists: \nAndy Jack and Toby Lunt\, L’Etoile alums and insect cuisine innovators. \nValerie Stull\, Postdoctoral Research Associate\, Global Health Institute; focusing on sustainable food systems\, food security and sovereignty and the implications of farmed edible insects as protein sources. \nMonica Theis\, Distinguished Lecturer\, Department of Food Science; registered dietitian nutritionist specializing in Food\, Food Service Operations and Food Systems Management. \nModerated by Sainath Suryanarayanan\, Assistant Scientist\, Population Health Institute; expertise in social insect biology and molecular pharmacology and the politics of multispecies entanglements in sociogenomics\, beekeeping and agriculture. \nWhat is Food Poster \n \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/what-is-food-and-who-decides-insects-as-food/ LOCATION:Meadowridge Branch\, Madison Public Library\, 5726 Raymond Rd\, Madison\, WI\, 53711 CATEGORIES:Special Events,STS Related Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191022T190000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191022T190000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190920T120906Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190920T122344Z UID:3774-1571770800-1571770800@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Preparing for Climate Change: Learning\, Adaptation and Our Climate Future DESCRIPTION:Preparing for Climate Change: Learning\, Adaptation and Our Climate Future\nA talk and discussion\, led by Noah Weeth Feinstein\, Director of the Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies \nNoah Weeth Feinstein will introduce the critical role of learning in adapting to social and environmental change before facilitating a discussion with a panel of education experts and community leaders. \nPreparing for Climate Change Poster \n \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/preparing-for-climate-change/ LOCATION:Wisconsin Institute for Discovery\, 330 North Orchard Street\, Madison\, WI\, 53715 GEO:43.0729696;-89.4080713 X-APPLE-STRUCTURED-LOCATION;VALUE=URI;X-ADDRESS=Wisconsin Institute for Discovery 330 North Orchard Street Madison WI 53715;X-APPLE-RADIUS=500;X-TITLE=330 North Orchard Street:geo:-89.4080713,43.0729696 CATEGORIES:Co-Sponsored Events,Special Events,STS Related Events,UW Campus Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191024T123000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191024T133000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190501T174937Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191021T173217Z UID:3220-1571920200-1571923800@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Decedent as Epistemic Object: Ontologies\, technologies\, and enaction in a collaborative research program DESCRIPTION:Decedent as Epistemic Object: Ontologies\, technologies\, and enaction in a collaborative research program\nA Brown Bag with Dylan Lott\, Postdoctoral Research Associate\, Center for Healthy Minds \nSince 2012\, scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Center for Healthy Minds have worked with the Tibetan Medical and Astrological College and Delek Allopathic Hospital in Dharamsala\, India to conduct research on a phenomenon known as tukdam (Tib.\, thugs dam)\, a unique meditative state which Tibetan Buddhist believe can be achieved at the moment of death. Specially trained Tibetan doctors in India record peri- and post-mortem physiological data in the effort to document the alleged effects of this meditative state. Unfolding in tandem with this psychophysiological research is an ethnographic project that seeks to understand the conceptual\, pragmatic\, institutional\, cultural and interpersonal mechanisms whereby divergent knowledge-systems—including biomedicine and Tibetan Buddhist tantric theory—compete and cohere within this research framework. At this Brown Bag\, I will offer an account of the project’s history and its rationale before turning to an exploration of the ways in which different types of expertise are enacted in relation to the decedent body under investigation. \nLott Brown Bag Poster \n  \nFurther reading: \n“Waking\, Dreaming\, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience\, Meditation\, and Philosophy“\, Chapter 9\, Evan Thompson \n“Inventing a new death and making it believable Anthropology & Medicine“\, Vol. 9\, No. 2\, 2002\, Margret Lock \n“The Body Multiple“\, Annemarie Mol \nFor those with an interest in the specifics of the Tibetan Buddhist account of death and dying:\n“Death\, Intermediate State\, and Rebirth in Tibetan Buddhism“\, Lati Rinpoche and Jeffrey Hopkins \n  \n \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/lott/ LOCATION:8411 Social Science CATEGORIES:Brown Bag Series END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191029T183000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191029T183000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190909T160654Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191010T184515Z UID:3608-1572373800-1572373800@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:What is Food and Who Decides?: Current Debates About Milk and Meat DESCRIPTION:Are plant-based milks milk? Is meat really meat if it is grown in a lab? Which stakeholders will get a say in making these decisions about our food? How can the public get involved in making these policies? This panel brings experts on food regulation and law together with experts on milk and meat to discuss food regulation and the present and future of milk and meat. There will be plenty of time for audience questions and discussion. \nPanelists: \nScott Rankin\, Professor and Chair of the Food Science Department; studying foods manufacturing\, including pasteurization\, dairy chemistry\, ice cream\, and cheese grading. \nJeff Sindelar\, Associate Professor/Extension Meat Specialist\, Animal Sciences; expert in meat science\, processing and food safety. \nSteph Tai\, Professor\, UW-Madison Law School; specializing in environmental and administrative law\, food systems law\, and risk regulation. \nMonica Theis\, Distinguished Lecturer\, Department of Food Science; registered dietician nutritionist specializing in Food\, Food Service Operations and Food Systems Management. \nModerated by Noah Weeth Feinstein\, Director of the Holtz Center for Science & Technology Studies\, Associate Professor of Curriculum & Instruction. \nSuggested reading: \nLegalizing the Meaning of Meat (September 2019)\, Loyola University Chicago Law Journal \n  \nWhat is Food Poster \n \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/what-is-food/ LOCATION:Oregon Public Library\, 256 Brook Street\, Oregon\, WI CATEGORIES:Special Events,STS Related Events ORGANIZER;CN="Oregon%20Public%20Library":MAILTO:orelib@oregonlibrary.org END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191031T170000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191031T170000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20191008T172802Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191008T172802Z UID:3881-1572541200-1572541200@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Call for Open Panels: Joint Meeting: EASST/4S DESCRIPTION:Call for Open Panels \nJoint Meeting: EASST / 4S \nPrague\, August 18-21\, 2020 \nDeadline: October 31\, 2019 \nPlease consider proposing an open panel for  2020 EASST / 4S Joint Meeting. The purpose of calling for open panel proposals is to stimulate the formation of new networks around topics of interest to the STS community and to facilitate the organization of robust paper sessions. \nOpen panel chairs will have significant responsibility in the composition of their panels. Please note\, in submitting a proposal\, you are volunteering to chair a session of papers related to your topic. An open panel may extend across up to three sessions of five papers each (i.e. a total of maximum 15 papers). \nAn open panel proposal consists of an abstract up to 250 words\, including a brief discussion of its contribution to STS and\, if relevant\, to the theme of the 2020 Joint conference. (See examples of open panel topics from last year here). Open panel topics\, once accepted by the Program Committee\, will be included in the general call for papers that will open on December 15th. At that time\, authors may nominate their papers for one or more panels. \nOpen Panel proposals should be submitted via the conference submission page by October 31. (Log in with your 4S credentials.) \nPlease note: \nThe general call for individual papers\, closed panels\, posters and Making and Doing presentations will open Dec. 15 and close Feb.29. \nOpen panel chairs will be consulted in regards to the selection of papers\, but because of the need to distribute paper submissions over many sessions\, the Program Committee has final authority over which papers will be included in each panel. \nRemember that there are guidelines to the number of roles you can take at the conference\, you can find the details here. \nQuestions? Email the 2020 team! \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/call-for-open-panels-joint-meeting-easst-4s/ CATEGORIES:deadlines,STS Related Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191101T080000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191103T170000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190820T152535Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190820T152555Z UID:3549-1572595200-1572800400@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:National Science Policy Network (NSPN) Annual Symposium DESCRIPTION:National Science Policy Network (NSPN) Symposium: Catalysts for Science Policy is hosting the NSPN’s annual symposium here in Madison\, WI on November 1-3\, 2019! This year’s theme is “Leveraging Science and Technology to Benefit Marginalized Populations.” The symposium features speakers\, workshops\, and 300+ attendees. Information about the symposium can be found online. \nEarly bird registration ends August 30th and individuals who qualify to become NSPN members can receive a 50% discount on the registration. Register for CaSP now which includes NSPN registration here! \nEvent website and full schedule for November 1-3\, 2019: https://scipolsymposium2019.casp.wisc.edu/ \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/national-science-policy-network-nspn-annual-symposium/ LOCATION:Madison\, Wisconsin CATEGORIES:STS Related Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191101T170000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191101T170000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190815T170036Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190927T143206Z UID:3535-1572627600-1572627600@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Faculty & Staff Travel Grants Deadline DESCRIPTION:Fall deadline: November 1 for travel January 1 – June 29 \nThe Holtz Center is pleased to offer travel awards of up to $1000 to Holtz Center faculty and staff members presenting STS-related research at conferences. Two cycles of awards are made annually. Please apply by November 1 for travel between January 1 and June 29\, and by April 1 for travel between June 30 and December 31. \nTo apply\, please send an abstract of the paper to be presented\, evidence of its acceptance to the conference\, estimated budget (travel\, lodging\, and conference fees)\, a list of other potential funding sources and a CV to Lyn Macgregor. \n \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/faculty-staff-travel-grants-deadline/ CATEGORIES:deadlines END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191101T170000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191101T170000 DTSTAMP:20191023T175056 CREATED:20190815T170216Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190927T142833Z UID:3538-1572627600-1572627600@sts.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Graduate Student Research Travel Grants Deadline DESCRIPTION:Fall deadline (for Winter/Spring Cycle): November 1 \nThe Robert F. and Jean E. Holtz Center for Science & Technology Studies invites proposals for travel grants of up to $1\,000 from graduate students working on STS-related research\, that is\, research on the intersections of society with science\, technology\, or medicine. Funds may be used for travel to research sites or for presenting papers at professional conferences. Some preference will be given to students with a Ph.D. minor in STS\, but students in all departments are encouraged to apply. Eligible research activities include visits to ethnographic research sites\, travel to conduct interviews or engage in collaborative work\, and trips to archival collections and specialized libraries. A list of recent winners is below. \n* Beginning in AY 2017\, Holtz Center Travel Awards must be paid as reimbursements for travel. Lodging\, transportation and other expenses can only be reimbursed when they are consistent with UW Travel Policy. \n \n URL:https://sts.wisc.edu/event/graduate-student-research-travel-grants-deadline/ CATEGORIES:deadlines END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR